Medicine

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
We read with interest the GBD 2015 Healthcare Access and Quality study (July 15, 2017, p 231),1 which constructed the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index on the basis of risk-standardised cause-specific death rates to facilitate comparisons of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. However, we would like to contest some of the findings on the HAQ Index related to chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Categories: Medicine

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
We read with interest the article by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) collaborators on the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index.1 However, we believe the scaled indicator on measles amenable mortality should be interpreted with caution.
Categories: Medicine

[Correspondence] Challenges of measuring the Healthcare Access and Quality Index – Authors' reply

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
Estimating national levels of personal health-care access and quality can inform the understanding of settings in which gains in health care can be achieved. Amenable mortality—deaths that should not occur in the presence of high-quality health care—has been used to approximate country-level personal health-care access and quality for decades.1 Drawing from this scientific approach, the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) collaboration developed the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index,2 which aimed to provide a stronger indication of personal health-care quality and access across 195 countries and territories over time.
Categories: Medicine

[Correspondence] Trans people and the myth of homogeneous societies

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
In their Comment, Arjee Restar and Sari Reisner (Oct 28, 2017, p 1933)1 briefly hint at the diversity in health risk within the transgender (trans) community but then fail to take their recommendations further. For example, among the 60 million refugees worldwide, trans people are particularly at risk of violence and discrimination.2 Yet discrimination based on gender identity and migration status are usually treated separately, as the Comment's omission illustrates.1 Many trans people experience discrimination on multiple grounds, such as refugee status, socioeconomic position, age, and physical and cognative ability, in addition to gender identity, leading to possibly even more negative health consequences than in non-trans people.
Categories: Medicine

[Department of Error] Department of Error

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
Honigsbaum M. Flawed hero. Lancet 2017; 389: 1874—In this Perspective, the third and fourth sentences in the penultimate paragraph should have read “However, it is in his justification for his action and what he did next that the story becomes fraught. Wadman allows the reader to draw their own conclusions about his fall from grace.” This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 1, 2018.
Categories: Medicine

[Department of Error] Department of Error

Lancet - 3 February 2018 - 12:00am
Howlett P, Walder A, Lisk D, et al. Neurological and psychiatric manifestations of post Ebola syndrome in Sierra Leone. Lancet 2017; 389 (suppl): S48—In this Abstract, S Sevalie should have been listed as an author. This correction has been made to the online version as of Feb 1, 2018.
Categories: Medicine

[Correspondence] Turkish Medical Association central council detained for demanding peace

Lancet - 2 February 2018 - 11:54am
On Jan 24, 2018, the central council of the Turkish Medical Association (TTB) issued a short statement to express its opinion against the ongoing military operations by the Turkish army in northern Syria and to call for an end to the war by demanding peace.1 In its short announcement, TTB underscored the validity of its professional oath and duty to defend human lives.1
Categories: Medicine

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